Best Cities For New College Graduates To Find A Job In 2016

images (17)Congratulations!

Your name was on the grad list. All your efforts were worth it after all, and now you’re set to achieve greater things!

First, you’ll have to find the right city to ignite your career as a new college graduate, so you can make it to the top as quickly as you can.

But with so many cities and options, where exactly should you start? How would you know the best city to find the right entry-level job and affordable cost of living for new college graduates?

Starting your career in the right city can help you put the right foot forward – so we’ve compiled the best cities for new college graduates to find a job this year.

10 Best Cities for New College Graduates To Find A Job In 2016

1. Pittsburgh, PA

In 2015, the United States Census Bureau estimated that Pittsburgh is home to 304, 391 people. But as a new college graduate, what are your chances of finding the right job in the Steel City?

The Bureau of Labor Statistics says the United States unemployment rate as of April 2016 was 5.30 percent, while Pittsburgh’s unemployment rate during that same period was 5.4 percent.

So lets dig deeper to see how your career could turn out if you decide to move to Pittsburgh.

The median home price of this city is $111,300, while the cost of living is 10% lower than the national average.

Also, the average commute time in Pittsburgh is 25.95 minutes. While 54 percent of commuters in Pittsburgh drive inside their car all alone, about 10 percent carpool with others, 19 percent use mass transit and 3 percent work from home.

As a new college graduate, chances are, you’ll consider renting a home when you move to Pittsburgh.

2. Cincinnati, OH

Cincinnati is one of the best cities for new college graduates looking to find a job this year. In July 2015, the United States Census Bureau estimated that Cincinnati is home to 298,550 people.

Compared to other cities in the United States, Cincinnati’s cost of living is 16.60% lower than the national average. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Cincinnati’s unemployment rate as of April 2016 was 4.2 percent while the national average was 5.30. The good news is job availability is rising and recently at a rate of 2.29 percent.

But how fast can you make it to your office if you find a job in Cincinnati? The average commute time of this city is 22 minutes, 3 minutes faster than the national average of 25 minutes. If you own a car, you can join the 71 percent of commuters who drive in their car alone. Up to 8 percent of commuters take mass transit, 10 percent carpool with others, while 4 percent work from home.

3. Kansas City, MO

Starting out in the right city can give you an edge in your career.

There is more to Kansas City than its world champion baseball team and its barbecues, though they are really tasty. As of July 2015, Kansas City’s population was estimated at 475,378 says the United States Census Bureau.

The median home cost of this city is $132,300, while the unemployment rate was 3.9 as of April, 2016 according to Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The cost of living in Kansas City is 5.90% lower than the United States average which is 6.30. So how soon can you make it to your office if you’re hired in Kansas City?

The average commute time in this city is 21.32 minutes, few minutes lower than the national average of 25 minutes. 81 percent of commuters in this city drive their own car alone, 9 percent carpool with others, 4 percent use mass transit, while 4 percent work from home.

4. Indianapolis, IN

Indianapolis is home to 831,230 people making it the largest city in Indiana according to the United States Census Bureau. The median home price in this city is $120, 500, while the cost of living is 11.10% lower than the United States average.

The unemployment rate in Indianapolis was 4.7 percent as of April 2016, which was lower than the national average of 5.30.

So how fast can you get to work in Indianapolis? The average commute time in this city is 22.7 minutes, lower than the United States average of 25 minutes. In this city, 82 percent of commuters drive in their car alone, 10 percent commute in the same car with others, 2 percent use public transportation, while 3 percent work from home.

Since you’re a new college graduate, chances are you’ll consider renting a home or an apartment for a start.

5. Nashville, TN

According to the United States Census Bureau, the population of Nashville, Tennessee as of July 2015 was 654,610. The median home value in Nashville is $188,400. The cost of living in Nashville is 0.80% lower than the United States average.

The unemployment rate in Nashville was is 3.1 percent as of April 2016, while the United States average was 5.30 percent.

The average commute time in this city is 23.09 minutes. In that time, 80 percent of commuters drive their own car, 11 percent commute with others in their car, 2 percent take mass transit, while 5 percent work from home.

6. Columbus, OH

The population of Columbus City was 850,106 as of July 2015 according to the United States Census Bureau. The median home price in Columbus is $95,900. The cost of living in Columbus is 17.90% lower than the United States average.

The unemployment rate in this city is 3.9 percent and its lower than the U.S. average of 5.30 percent according to the United States Census Bureau. The good news is Columbus City’s job growth have been positive in recent years and as a new college graduate, your chances of finding entry level jobs are high here.

In Columbus City, the average commute time is 21 minutes, 3 percent work from home, 81 percent of commuters drive in their car alone, about 9 percent carpool with others while 3 percent take mass transit.

What about housing? Odds are you’ll have to rent a home or an apartment when you get your first job in Columbus City.

7. Minneapolis – St. Paul, MN

The population of Minneapolis according to the United States Census Bureau is 410,939. The median home value in this city is $190,900. The cost of living in Minneapolis is 8% higher than the national average compared to the other parts of the country.

The unemployment rate in this city was 3.40 percent as of April 2016, while the national average was 5.30 percent according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The average commute time in this city is 22.19 minutes. 14 percent of commuters in Minneapolis take mass transit, 62 percent of commuters drive their cars alone, 5 percent work from home, while 9 percent carpool with others.

8. Philadelphia, PA

According to the United States Census Bureau, Philadelphia is home to 1,567,442 people, making it one of the top ten largest metropolitan areas in the United States. Philadelphia’s medium home cost is $103,400. The cost of living in this city is 3.80 percent lower than the United States average.

Considering its large population, Philadelphia’s unemployment rate is 6.6 percent as of April 2016, while the United Sates average at the same period was 5.30 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The average commute time in Philadelphia is 32 minutes, 26 percent of commuters take mass transit, 50 percent of commuters drive their own car, 9 percent carpool with others, while 3 percent work from home.

9. Chicago, I

How many people live in Chicago? According to the United States Census Bureau, the population of people living in Chicago as of July 2015 was 2,720, 546. Chicago’s median home price is $165,700.

The cost of living in Chicago is 3.40 higher than the United States average.

The unemployment rate of this city is 4.7 percent as of May 2016 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The average commute time in Chicago is 33.49 minutes, 27 percent of commuters take mass transit, 50 percent drive in their own car alone, 10 percent carpool with others, while 4 percent work from home.